planets-bend-between-us:

can I just voice a few unpopular opinions regarding my take on feminism?

  • the idea of a damsel in distress is not anti-feminist until the need for saving becomes the sole purpose of the character. while stories of women who don’t need saving are groundbreaking and empowering, it’s, in my opinion, anti-feminist to place the character so high up on a pedestal that they will never need saving. feminism isn’t about glorifying a gender; it’s about equality. so a woman (who is defined outside of being a damsel in distress) that needs saving at some point is, therefore, not anti-feminist.
  • the structure of marriage, family, and what may be viewed as the stereotypical lifestyle that follows is not anti-feminist. some women choose this lifestyle. some women want to be stay at home moms and raise a family and do household work while their husband provides financially, versus being a career woman. and there is nothing wrong with any of those choices.
  • while many of us agree that slut shaming is anti-feminist, the girl who chooses not to engage in a sexual lifestyle is not anti-feminist either, unless they are participating in slut shaming themselves. some women will choose to remain abstinent, some may even choose to wait until marriage or at least until they’re in a long-term relationship to have sex. that’s perfectly acceptable. shaming them for that choice is defying feminism.
  • females and female characters do not need to be doctors, lawyers, scientists, physicists, linguists, psychologists, intellectual creatures, or super heroes with super powers to be strong women. this idea in itself is anti-feminist, as it implies that anything mediocre or below is shameful. feminism is an inclusive cause, meaning that every person of every background, belief, status, orientation, and intellectual level are represented equally.

disclaimer: I don’t claim to represent everyone’s ideas of what feminism is and should be. the only person I’m representing is myself and my own opinions. and if you just happen to agree with me, that is fantastic!




fauxprophetess:

“Most maidens are perfectly capable of rescuing themselves in my experience, at least the ones worth something, in any case.” - The Night Circus

fauxprophetess:

“Most maidens are perfectly capable of rescuing themselves in my experience, at least the ones worth something, in any case.” - The Night Circus

(via teachingliteracy)


thedailywhat:

On Kony 2012: I honestly wanted to stay as far away as possible from KONY 2012, the latest fauxtivist fad sweeping the web (remember “change your Facebook profile pic to stop child abuse”?), but you clearly won’t stop sending me that damn video until I say something about it, so here goes:
Stop sending me that video.
The organization behind Kony 2012 — Invisible Children Inc. — is an extremely shady nonprofit that has been called ”misleading,” “naive,” and “dangerous” by a Yale political science professor, and has been accused by Foreign Affairs of “manipulat[ing] facts for strategic purposes.” They have also been criticized by the Better Business Bureau for refusing to provide information necessary to determine if IC meets the Bureau’s standards.
Additionally, IC has a low two-star rating in accountability from Charity Navigator because they won’t let their financials be independently audited. That’s not a good thing. In fact, it’s a very bad thing, and should make you immediately pause and reflect on where the money you’re sending them is going.
By IC’s own admission, only 31% of all the funds they receive go toward actually helping anyone [pdf]. The rest go to line the pockets of the three people in charge of the organization, to pay for their travel expenses (over $1 million in the last year alone) and to fund their filmmaking business (also over a million) — which is quite an effective way to make more money, as clearly illustrated by the fact that so many can’t seem to stop forwarding their well-engineered emotional blackmail to everyone they’ve ever known.
And as far as what they do with that money:

The group is in favour of direct military intervention, and their money supports the Ugandan government’s army and various other military forces. Here’s a photo of the founders of Invisible Children posing with weapons and personnel of the Sudan People’s Liberation Army. Both the Ugandan army and Sudan People’s Liberation Army are riddled with accusations of rape and looting, but Invisible Children defends them, arguing that the Ugandan army is “better equipped than that of any of the other affected countries”, although Kony is no longer active in Uganda and hasn’t been since 2006 by their own admission. These books each refer to the rape and sexual assault that are perennial issues with the UPDF, the military group Invisible Children is defending.

Let’s not get our lines crossed: The Lord’s Resistance Army is bad news. And Joseph Kony is a very bad man, and needs to be stopped. But propping up Uganda’s decades-old dictatorship and its military arm, which has been accused by the UN of committing unspeakable atrocities and itself facilitated the recruitment of child soldiers, is not the way to go about it.
The United States is already plenty involved in helping rout Kony and his band of psycho sycophants. Kony is on the run, having been pushed out of Uganda, and it’s likely he will soon be caught, if he isn’t already dead. But killing Kony won’t fix anything, just as killing Osama bin Laden didn’t end terrorism. The LRA might collapse, but, as Foreign Affairs points out, it is “a relatively small player in all of this — as much a symptom as a cause of the endemic violence.”
Myopically placing the blame for all of central Africa’s woes on Kony — even as a starting point — will only imperil many more people than are already in danger.
Sending money to a nonprofit that wants to muck things up by dousing the flames with fuel is not helping. Want to help? Really want to help? Send your money to nonprofits that are putting more than 31% toward rebuilding the region’s medical and educational infrastructure, so that former child soldiers have something worth coming home to.
Here are just a few of those charities. They all have a sparkling four-star rating from Charity Navigator, and, more importantly, no interest in airdropping American troops armed to the teeth into the middle of a multi-nation tribal war to help one madman catch another.
The bottom line is, research your causes thoroughly. Don’t just forward a random video to a stranger because a mass murderer makes a five-year-old “sad.” Learn a little bit about the complexities of the region’s ongoing strife before advocating for direct military intervention.
There is no black and white in the world. And going about solving important problems like there is just serves to make all those equally troubling shades of gray invisible.
[kony2012.]

thedailywhat:

On Kony 2012: I honestly wanted to stay as far away as possible from KONY 2012, the latest fauxtivist fad sweeping the web (remember “change your Facebook profile pic to stop child abuse”?), but you clearly won’t stop sending me that damn video until I say something about it, so here goes:

Stop sending me that video.

The organization behind Kony 2012 — Invisible Children Inc. — is an extremely shady nonprofit that has been called ”misleading,” “naive,” and “dangerous” by a Yale political science professor, and has been accused by Foreign Affairs of “manipulat[ing] facts for strategic purposes.” They have also been criticized by the Better Business Bureau for refusing to provide information necessary to determine if IC meets the Bureau’s standards.

Additionally, IC has a low two-star rating in accountability from Charity Navigator because they won’t let their financials be independently audited. That’s not a good thing. In fact, it’s a very bad thing, and should make you immediately pause and reflect on where the money you’re sending them is going.

By IC’s own admission, only 31% of all the funds they receive go toward actually helping anyone [pdf]. The rest go to line the pockets of the three people in charge of the organization, to pay for their travel expenses (over $1 million in the last year alone) and to fund their filmmaking business (also over a million) — which is quite an effective way to make more money, as clearly illustrated by the fact that so many can’t seem to stop forwarding their well-engineered emotional blackmail to everyone they’ve ever known.

And as far as what they do with that money:

The group is in favour of direct military intervention, and their money supports the Ugandan government’s army and various other military forces. Here’s a photo of the founders of Invisible Children posing with weapons and personnel of the Sudan People’s Liberation Army. Both the Ugandan army and Sudan People’s Liberation Army are riddled with accusations of rape and looting, but Invisible Children defends them, arguing that the Ugandan army is “better equipped than that of any of the other affected countries”, although Kony is no longer active in Uganda and hasn’t been since 2006 by their own admission. These books each refer to the rape and sexual assault that are perennial issues with the UPDF, the military group Invisible Children is defending.

Let’s not get our lines crossed: The Lord’s Resistance Army is bad news. And Joseph Kony is a very bad man, and needs to be stopped. But propping up Uganda’s decades-old dictatorship and its military arm, which has been accused by the UN of committing unspeakable atrocities and itself facilitated the recruitment of child soldiers, is not the way to go about it.

The United States is already plenty involved in helping rout Kony and his band of psycho sycophants. Kony is on the run, having been pushed out of Uganda, and it’s likely he will soon be caught, if he isn’t already dead. But killing Kony won’t fix anything, just as killing Osama bin Laden didn’t end terrorism. The LRA might collapse, but, as Foreign Affairs points out, it is “a relatively small player in all of this — as much a symptom as a cause of the endemic violence.”

Myopically placing the blame for all of central Africa’s woes on Kony — even as a starting point — will only imperil many more people than are already in danger.

Sending money to a nonprofit that wants to muck things up by dousing the flames with fuel is not helping. Want to help? Really want to help? Send your money to nonprofits that are putting more than 31% toward rebuilding the region’s medical and educational infrastructure, so that former child soldiers have something worth coming home to.

Here are just a few of those charities. They all have a sparkling four-star rating from Charity Navigator, and, more importantly, no interest in airdropping American troops armed to the teeth into the middle of a multi-nation tribal war to help one madman catch another.

The bottom line is, research your causes thoroughly. Don’t just forward a random video to a stranger because a mass murderer makes a five-year-old “sad.” Learn a little bit about the complexities of the region’s ongoing strife before advocating for direct military intervention.

There is no black and white in the world. And going about solving important problems like there is just serves to make all those equally troubling shades of gray invisible.

[kony2012.]

(via wasraxacorico-deactivated201212)



Some thoughts about Kony 2012.

dream-within-a-dream:

Unless you don’t have Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr…. you’ve seen the video made about Joseph Kony. I think it’s great that people are interested and wanting to speak out about the atrocities. However, this problem has been internationally know for decades and publicly known for the past couple of years. If people had picked up a newspaper or turned on a news channel they would have most likely heard something about this. I remember reading about it 3 years ago in the New York Times. The sad part is this is only 1 of countless human rights abuses that are going on around the world daily that no on gives a second thought to. I may be cynical and dissolutioned but I feel that people are jumping on the Kony bandwagon because they see everyone else is and in a few weeks or a month this will be a distint memory. 

I think the film Hotel Rwanda put it best, “I think if people see this footage, they’ll say Oh, my God, that’s horrible. And then they’ll go on eating their dinners.”

I sincerely hope I’m wrong. 


Dance, Dance (String Quartet)
Fall Out Boy
String Quartet Tribute To Fall Out Boy

Dance, Dance // String Quartet Tribute to Fall Out Boy

(via chu2thebeam)


aseaofquotes:

E. Nesbit, The Enchanted Castle

aseaofquotes:

E. Nesbit, The Enchanted Castle

(via teachingliteracy)



aseaofquotes:

— Andre Berthiaume 

aseaofquotes:

— Andre Berthiaume 

(via teachingliteracy)


nightmare-kisser:

trelela:

maryroman:

artboxconcepts:

ARTBOXMagazine: Detroit’s abandoned houses.

I really like the third house it’s so pretty.

Abandoned buildings have such a weird charm I always loved.

 3, 5, and 7 are gorgeous, omg. <3

(via crownoflilacs)


aseaofquotes:

Kaye Gibbons, Ellen Foster

aseaofquotes:

Kaye Gibbons, Ellen Foster

(via teachingliteracy)


best love story ever

(via chu2thebeam)